Alaska Performance Scholarship

Alaska High School Students –

Earn the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) to pay for college or training in Alaska

reward offered
Level 1

up to $4,755 per year

  • High School GPA 3.5
  • ACT - 25 or SAT 1680
  • Specified high school curriculum
Level 2

up to $3,566 per year

  • High School GPA 3.0
  • ACT - 23 or SAT 1560
  • Specified high school curriculum
Level 3

up to $2,378 per year

  • High School GPA 2.5
  • ACT - 21 or SAT 1450
  • Specified high school curriculum
Career and Technical Awards can be earned with qualifying WorkKeys instead of ACT/SAT scores.
  • Same curriculum requirements and award levels as the collegiate award
  • With the determining factor for the level awarded being the students GPA

     


  • About the APS
  • Curriculum Requirements
  • Qualifying/Eligibility
  • Testing & GPA
  • Applying
  • Using the Award

When will I be able to find out my APS award level?

Graduates of the high school class of 2011 were the first Alaskans eligible for award. Future Alaska high school graduates who qualify for the APS can receive an award for enrollment in a qualifying program beginning on or after August 1st following graduation. Final award notification is made after the postsecondary education confirms qualifying enrollment. Students can monitor their status in their Alaska Student Aid Portal (ASAP) account.


Is funding available for scholarships?

Yes! On April 15, 2012, the legislature passed legislation establishing the Higher Education Investment Fund, intended to be a source of long-term funding for the Alaska Performance Scholarship and Alaska Education Grant. The bill was signed into law by Governor Parnell on September 13, 2012, allowing the previously set aside $400 million to be transferred into the new fund.


How much is the scholarship award?

There are three maximum award levels: $4,755 a year, $3,566 a year, and $2,378 a year. Alaska Performance Scholarship recipients may remain eligible for up to eight semesters of enrollment. Awards will be prorated in the event insufficient funding is available upon initial award (usually calculated in early August). In every case, award recipients must apply for and use any other non-loan aid they receive, such as state or federal grants or other scholarships, before the Alaska Performance Scholarship is applied toward payment of their remaining costs. The recipient will not receive an APS in an amount that exceeds the remaining costs of attendance.

Note:The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculated based upon FAFSA data is considered self-help and does not reduce the APS amount a student may receive.


What determines the level of scholarship earned?

A combination of the eligible student's high school GPA and score on a college-entrance or career-readiness examination. For eligible students at schools that do not award grades, the Department of Education & Early Development will develop alternate, equivalent requirements.

See also: What are the specific examination and grade point average requirements?


What is the difference between the UA Scholars program and the Alaska Performance Scholarship?

The UA Scholars Award is a program of the University of Alaska that awards an $11,000 scholarship to the top 10 percent of graduates from each qualified Alaska high school. The award may be used for attendance at any UA campus statewide. Students are designated by their high school based on their standing at the end of their junior year. The program does not require a specific GPA, test score, or curriculum. UA Scholars receive $1,375 per semester for up to eight semesters. The award amount is fixed and is not dependent on other financial aid received. Once enrolled, UA Scholars must maintain full-time enrollment status and a 2.5 cumulative GPA to remain eligible for the award. For more information on the UA Scholars program, go to www.alaska.edu/scholars/

The Alaska Performance Scholarship is a program of the State of Alaska. It can be awarded to any Alaska high school graduate meeting eligibility requirements, including GPA, test scores, and curriculum. The award can be used for postsecondary training at a college or approved career and technical program in Alaska. A student's eligibility amount varies based on GPA and test scores. In addition, the amount a student can receive is limited by costs of attendance, as certified by the postsecondary institution the student attends, and other financial aid. A prorated Alaska Performance Scholarship award may be available for eligible students studying at least half-time.

All recipients must meet annual satisfactory academic progress.


Can students who are UA Scholars also receive an Alaska Performance Scholarship?

Yes. However, in some cases, the amount of the Alaska Performance Scholarship award may be reduced. The APS amount may not exceed an award recipient's unmet costs of attendance after all other non-loan aid a recipient is eligible for has been applied.


What does APS/AEG Set-Aside Eligible High Schools mean?

APS/AEG Set-Aside Eligible High Schools:

A portion of each year's APS and AEG funds is reserved and awarded to APS and AEG-eligible students graduating from an Alaska district with less than 800 students, or from a high school operated by the Alaska State-Operated School System. If you graduated prior to 2011 from a high school that meets either of these criteria, be sure to log in to your Alaska Student Aid Portal (ASAP) account and specify your high school. If your school is not listed but you believe it meets on of the two criteria in the year you graduated, please contact us at 800-441-2962.

Note: ACPE may verify that you graduated from the school you indicated.

What does a "rigorous high school curriculum" mean?

There are two curriculum options students may choose from to be eligible for the scholarship. The two options are:


Math and Science

Four years of math, four years of English, four years of science, and four years of social studies. However, one year of the four years of social studies can be substituted with one year of foreign language, Alaska Native language, American Sign Language, fine arts, or cultural heritage.


Social Studies and Language

Three years of math, four years of English, three years of science, four years of social studies, and two years of the same foreign language, Alaska Native language, or American Sign Language.

Please note: Beginning with the high school graduating class of 2015, a menu of specific course titles that can be used will be associated with each subject area. Curriculum requirements were phased in for the classes of 2011 and 2012. Refer to the APS requirements for your class year for details.

Students who are not enrolled in a public school program and are independently home schooled or who attend private schools must provide information about their courses and grades to the Department of Education & Early Development through the APS Private School Eligibility Determination Request Form to be considered for eligibility.


Can a challenged course be used to meet the APS curriculum requirements?

AS 14.03.073 Secondary school course credit provides the opportunity for secondary school students to challenge a course by demonstrating mastery in mathematics, language arts, science, social studies, and world languages at the level of the course challenged. A school district shall give full credit for a course to a student who successfully challenges that course. It is up to the local district to establish an assessment tool and a standard for demonstrating mastery.

A student who successfully challenges a course and receives full credit can use that course to meet the APS curriculum requirements, if the course is an approved standard or additional course as determined by the district. This includes challenged courses in which a "pass/fail" assessment is used by the district.


Is there anything I can do if my school doesn't offer enough courses to meet the curriculum requirements?

There is no exemption from the curriculum requirements for each respective high school graduating class. Students are encouraged to discuss options available to them with their guidance counselor, such as distance education or dual-credit college courses.

Who can get an Alaska Performance Scholarship?

An Alaska resident who graduates from an Alaska high school in or after 2011, and who meets the following requirements:

  1. Completes a rigorous high school curriculum, as defined by regulations
  2. Achieves a high school GPA of at least 2.5 or equivalent
  3. Earns a minimum score on a college or career readiness test
  4. Enrolls at least half time, and remains in good standing, in a certificate or higher program at a qualifying Alaska institution
  5. Has qualifying unmet costs of attendance after considering all other non-loan aid
  6. Has not yet received the maximum Alaska scholarship program aid (8 semesters)

This includes graduates from public schools and private schools, and home school students who have taken the required courses. Students who hold GEDs are not eligible.


Are high school seniors graduating in December eligible for the APS?

High school seniors graduating a semester early (in December) can receive the Alaska Performance Scholarship if they meet all eligibility requirements. However, it is important to note that they are still considered part of their graduating class. For example, a student graduating in December 2013 is required to meet the curriculum requirements for the class of 2014. APS awards for December graduates will not be available until after the completion of the school year. Therefore, they may not receive any award for postsecondary study before the start of the next academic year, even if they graduate in December and begin a postsecondary program of study prior to the end of the school year.


Is a student who does not receive a high school diploma (instead receives a General Education Development certificate or Certificate of Achievement) eligible for the Alaska Performance Scholarship?

No. Students must graduate from an Alaska high school with a high school diploma, and meet all other eligibility requirements, to be eligible for the scholarship.


Are homeschooled students eligible for the APS?

Homeschooled students can qualify for the APS.

Homeschooled students who participate in a school district program will have their eligibility information (GPA, entrance exam scores, curriculum) reported by the district office to the Department of Education & Early Development. Students seeking a determination need only submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply.

Privately homeschooled students who are not enrolled in a public school program must submit the APS Private School Eligibility Determination Application to the Department of Education & Early Development. The form requests information about the student's identification and education, as well as copies of transcripts and entrance exam score reports. The eligibility determination request form and required supporting documents must be received by July 15 for students to be considered for the APS. Students seeking determination must also complete the FAFSA no later than June 30 of the year in which they plan to use the award.


Are private school students eligible for the APS?

Students attending private schools accredited under 4 AAC 04.300 can qualify for the APS.

Private school students need to submit the APS Private School Eligibility Determination Application to the Department of Education & Early Development. The form requests information about the student's identification and education, as well as copies of transcripts and entrance exam score reports. The eligibility determination request form and required supporting documents must be received by July 15 for students to be considered for the APS. Students seeking a determination must also complete the FAFSA no later than June 30 of the year in which they plan to use the award.


Are students who receive a high school diploma through a program like the Alaska Military Youth Academy or Job Corps eligible for the Alaska Performance Scholarship?

There are several private high school completion programs in Alaska that offer a GED program, a high school diploma program, or both. Students who receive a GED are not eligible for the scholarship; however, those who receive an Alaska high school diploma through such programs may be eligible as long as they meet all other requirements. Such students must submit the APS Private School Eligibility Determination Application to the Department of Education & Early Development to determine if their high school credential is equivalent to a qualifying Alaska diploma, for purposes of determining scholarship eligibility.


Can students qualify for the APS using WorkKeys Scores?

Yes. Students can qualify for a Career and Technical Education (CTE) APS award using WorkKeys Scores. The CTE APS award can be used for attendance at an approved career and technical education certification program, but not for a degree program. The CTE APS Curriculum requirements and award levels are the same as the collegiate APS award, with the determining factor for the level awarded being the student's GPA. A combined WorkKeys score of 13 (with no score lower than 4) meets the test score requirements for the CTE APS award. However, by qualifying with an ACT or SAT score, students would be eligible to pursue a certificate or a degree program.


Is the child of an Alaska resident, who graduates from a high school outside of Alaska, for example, due to military assignment, eligible for the APS?

No. The statue governing the APS states that students must graduate from an Alaska high school. Therefore, students in the situation described are not eligible for the APS.

What are the specific examination and grade point average requirements?

A combination of an examination result and GPA determine the level of scholarship eligible students can receive:

  1. For up to $4,755 a year – a GPA of 3.5 and a score of 25 on the ACT or 1680 on the SAT*
  2. For up to $3,566 a year – a GPA of 3.0 and a score of 23 on the ACT or 1560 on the SAT*
  3. For up to $2,378 a year – a GPA of 2.5 and a score of 21 on the ACT or 1450 on the SAT*

Be sure to list your high school as a recipient of your SAT and ACT test scores.

*Students entering an approved career and technical education certificate program can substitute WorkKeys Scores. For the graduating class of 2011 and 2012, the WorkKeys Score requirements were: a score of 5 in each of the three WorkKeys tests – applied mathematics, reading for information, and locating information. Beginning with the class of 2013, the WorkKeys Score requirements are: a combined WorkKeys Score of 13 (with no score lower than 4) in the three WorkKeys tests.


What if the student has a grade point average qualifying for a first-level award but examination scores that qualify for a lower award level?

A student will be eligible for the award level for which he or she satisfies all eligibility requirements. In the situation described in the question, the student would qualify for the lower award level.


What can I do to prepare for the SAT and/or ACT?

Talk to your high school counselor or a teacher about academic or test preparation resources available through your school. Make full use of online resources. Taking an online practice test gives you a good idea of what to expect on the exam and what areas to focus on when preparing for the test. You can find more at http://sat.collegeboard.com/practice and http://actstudent.org/testprep/index.html.


How can I make sure my high school gets my SAT and ACT scores?

SAT and ACT scores must be received by your high school before high school graduation to be used in determining your APS eligibility. You should request that your scores be sent to the school when you register for the test.

ACT: If you register online, you must list the correct high school when prompted to do so and be sure to check the "YES" box authorizing ACT to release your scores to that high school. If you register by mail, you authorize reporting by listing the correct high school code on the registration folder. Your scores will be sent three to eight weeks after the test.

SAT: Whether you register online or by paper, be sure to include your high school code. Your official score report will be provided to you and your high school, if you included the code, about five weeks after the test.

If you already took the test and did not have the scores sent to your school, you can request additional score reports from SAT and ACT. There may be a fee for additional reports.


If I take the SAT, ACT, and/or WorkKeys in the summer after I graduate high school, can I use those scores?

EED strongly encourages students to test between September and March – this is especially important for seniors. All APS eligibility requirements, including the test score, must be reported no later than July 15. Students are responsible for ensuring their test score is sent directly to their high school from the testing institution, as the high school must then report the score to the district office before the July 15 district reporting deadline. Note that according to SAT and ACT published information, it may take 6 to 8 weeks for score reports to be sent. EED recognizes that students may wish to retest in the spring to improve scores; however, EED cautions choosing a June assessment date, as scores may not be available in time.


I took the Sat, ACT, and/or WorkKeys multiple times. How will my scores be reported for scholarship purposes?

Your scholarship eligibility status is based on the information your school district provides to the Department of Education & Early Development (EED). EED is relying on the districts to determine your scholarship eligibility level and they may do so based on their standard policy or practice. Use of composite SAT or ACT scores is not prohibited.

Similarly, for WorkKeys, the school district may determine a student's scholarship eligibility by combining scores in each of the three tests (locating information, reading, mathematics), even if the tests were taken on different dates, as long as all of the relevant tests were taken at the student's school.


Can I take the WorkKeys exam at my local Job Center for purposes of qualifying for the APS?

The high school must record and add the student's WorkKeys exam scores to their permanent student record at the school, and report the scores to EED. If students miss the test day at their high school, they need to reschedule the test with the school.

Note that qualifying for APS solely based on WorkKeys scores (as opposed to an SAT or ACT score) will allow a student to use the award for pursuit of an approved career and technical education certificate program only.

How do I apply for the APS?

Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1 but no later than June 30 for each year you plan to use the APS award. You can access the FAFSA through the Alaska Student Aid Portal (ASAP). There is an alternate application available in ASAP for students attending schools that are not FAFSA-eligible.

Note that students graduating from private schools or who are privately homeschooled must submit the APS Private School Eligibility Determination Application to EED, in addition to applying via the FAFSA or alternate application.


How does the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculated from the FAFSA information impact my eligibility for the APS?

The EFC has no impact on the APS amount you can qualify for. While the APS amount you can receive may be reduced if you are eligible to receive non-loan aid (such as other grants and scholarships) that reduce your cost of attendance, the EFC is considered self-help aid and is therefore not included in any calculation of APS eligibility or award amount.


Which institutions receive FAFSA data and require completion of the FAFSA to apply for the APS?

To determine if the Alaska institution at which you intend to seek admission receives data from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), go to fafsa.ed.gov and use the School Code Search to see if it has a federal school code. If the institution has a federal school code, you must complete the FAFSA to receive an APS award at that institution.


If my selected school does not receive FAFSA data, how do I apply for an APS?

If your school does not have a federal school code, you need to use the alternate application available through the Alaska Student Aid Portal (ASAP). Non-FAFSA school and their programs need to be approved for participation in the APS. All institutions and programs approved by ACPE and the Department of Labor and Workforce Development are listed in a drop-down list on the alternate application.


When will students be notified they're eligible for the scholarship?

Students who have submitted the FAFSA can log in to the Alaska Student Aid Portal (ASAP) to securely access their eligibility information after August 1. If your eligibility information isn't available, check back weekly, as high school eligibility data is uploaded to ASAP on an ongoing basis. ACPE will also send a written award notice to students when their high school eligibility data is received. Students may also communicate directly with the Financial Aid Office at their postsecondary institution of enrollment.

Where can the scholarship be used?

The APS can be used at participating institutions in Alaska. The scholarship will be sent directly to the postsecondary institution for disbursement.

The APS can generally be used for certificate and degree programs offered by participating regionally and nationally accredited colleges and universities, with rare exceptions. At participating career and technical institutions, the APS can be used for certificate and/or degree programs approved for the APS by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

Note that students qualifying for the APS with WorkKeys scores can use the award for a career and technical education certificate program at either type of institution, but not for a degree program.


What costs can be covered by the scholarship?

Award recipients may use the funds for unpaid costs of attendance certified by the postsecondary institution. These costs may include tuition, fees, books, required tools and supplies, room and board and transportation, in accordance with the standard budgets published by the institution. However, recipients must apply for other non-loan aid, such as state or federal grants or other scholarships. The sum of all other non-loan aid for which a student is eligible (including the UA Scholars award, if a student is designated by a qualified Alaska high school) will be deducted from the cost of attendance. Scholarship recipients will not receive an Alaska Performance Scholarship amount that is more than the remaining cost. The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) identified on completion of the FAFSA is considered self-help and does not impact the Alaska Performance Scholarship amount a student may receive.

A prorated Alaska Performance Scholarship award may be available for eligible students studying at least half-time.


How are unmet costs of attendance calculated?

Costs of attendance are certified by the postsecondary institution. The cost of attendance may include tuition, fees, books, required tools and supplies, room and board and transportation. Costs of attendance is published in standard budges for each institution. All other non-loan aid (scholarships, grants, veteran's benefits, etc.) for which a student is eligible is deducted from the cost of attendance to calculate unmet costs of attendance. Scholarship recipients will not receive an Alaska Performance Scholarship amount that is more than the remaining unmet cost. Work-study aid, loan aid, and the federal Expected Family Contribution (EFC) do not reduce a student's maximum APS amount.


Example A: Remaining Cost of Attendance $11,755

In this example, the total non-loan aid the student receives does not impact the maximum eligibility for the APS. The maximum APS amount is also impacted by the award level – in this example, the student qualified for a level 1 award based on the GPA and test score combination achieved. In this example, the remaining costs of attendance are greater than the APS award amount, so the student is eligible for the full award of $4,755.


Example B: Remaining Cost of Attendance $3,750

In this example, the total non-loan aid the student receives does impact the maximum eligibility for the APS. The maximum APS amount is also impacted by the award level – in this example, the student qualified for a level 1 award (up to $,755) based on the GPA and test score combination achieved; however the maximum eligibility amount has been reduced to no more than the remaining unmet costs. Here, the remaining costs of attendance are less than the APS award amount, so the maximum amount the student may receive has been reduced accordingly


Must award recipients be enrolled full-time in the postsecondary institution?

Although full-time enrollment will impact the amount a student can receive, students enrolled at least half-time or for at least six semester credits can receive scholarships. Half-time graduate students enrolled in at least five semester credits and half-time vocational students enrolled in programs meeting at least 30 hours per week for at least six weeks may also qualify for a scholarship award. The scholarship amount will be proportionally reduced. Note that a half-time term counts equally as a full-time term towards the maximum 8 terms (4 years) of APS awards a student can receive.


Can the Alaska Performance Scholarship award be used for study abroad or study in another state as part of an exchange program?

Only if the study outside Alaska is part of a formal exchange program with an Alaska institution. As long as the otherwise qualified student remains enrolled in a degree program through an approved Alaska institution, and the Alaska institution is the recipient of the scholarship funds during the student's participation in an exchange program, the award can be used towards costs of attendance for the exchange program.


Can students begin their studies out of state and then use the award later if they return to Alaska to complete their studies, and/or to go to graduate school?

Students cannot use the award to attend postsecondary training or college outside of Alaska. However, students who are eligible for the award, but choose to study outside of Alaska, can return to Alaska and be certified to use their award at a later time. It is important to remember the award may only be used within six years of high school graduation, and the students must qualify as Alaska residents.


Can I take a year off before or during my postsecondary education?

The APS provides for up to 6 years in which to use the maximum 8 semesters of aid. If you take time off before college, remember that you must complete the FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1 but no later than June 30 in the year you plan to attend. If you take a year off while already in college, be sure to review the requirements for continuing eligibility. For example, as a first-year APS recipient, you are required to complete 24 credits and achieve a 2.0 GPA for the academic year. If you then take a year off and return the year after, you are considered a second-year recipient and must complete 30 credits and achieve a 2.5 GPA for continued eligibility.


Does the scholarship expire?

Yes. It must be used within six years of graduating high school unless the recipient qualifies for an extension, such as military service or an enrollment delay due to the availability of coursework that is beyond the student's control. Allowable extensions will be set in regulation by the State Board of Education & Early Development through a public process (see 4 AAC 43.045 Extensions of eligibility period).

Example: A student is experiencing delayed enrollment in the UAA Nursing Program due to the availability of coursework. The student can submit a written request to the EED Commissioner for a scholarship eligibility extension. The request must be accompanied by a signed statement from the institution of higher learning in which the student is admitted or enrolled attesting that the student has experienced or is experiencing an enrollment delay due to the availability of coursework required by the degree program the student is pursuing, and that the enrollment delay is beyond the student's control. The eligibility extension request must be postmarked no later than 30 days before the student's period of APS eligibility is set to expire.


Can a student who is eligible for different levels of the APS based on WorkKeys and the SAT/ACT requirement receive different level awards if the student pursues both a CTE certificate and a degree program?

In some cases, a student may qualify for two different levels of award based on different combinations of their GPA and test scores. For example, an eligible student might have a GPA of 3.5, an ACT score of 21, and WorkKeys scores of 5. In this case, a student is eligible for a level 1 award for pursuit of a career and technical education certificate program, but for a level 3 award for pursuit of a collegiate program such as an associate's or bachelor's degree.

A student with two eligibility levels may elect to pursue either or both program types. However, they cannot be used simultaneously and the total APS aid received may not exceed a total of 8 semesters. For example, a student could pursue a one-year certificate using two semesters of level 1 aid, and then enter a bachelor's degree to use up to six additional semesters of level 3 aid.

A student in this situation could also use up to the four total years of APS level 1 aid to receive multiple CTE certificates in sequence. Note – no more than one year of an award will be made for pursuit of the same career and technical certificate program, regardless of program length.

In either scenario, the student must still meet all continuing eligibility requirements to be eligible for an APS award for any subsequent certificate or term of study, including minimum GPA and credit accumulation requirements.


Can the APS be used during the summer?

Typically the award is disbursed in two halves – one for the fall and one for the spring term. IF a student has not yet used the full annual award in preceding terms, a student may be able to receive an award for a summer term. Contact ACPE at 1-800-441-2962 to learn more.


Once students receive the scholarship, what do they need to do to continue to qualify?

To continue to receive the scholarship, students need to:

  • File a new FAFSA or approved alternate application by the deadline each year
  • Continue to be enrolled in a qualifying program of study
  • Meet the annual satisfactory academic progress requirements, including number of credits earned and GPA applicable to your postsecondary grade level

At a minimum, satisfactory academic progress requirements include:

During your 1st year as an APS recipient:

  • complete 24 semester credits or equivalent for full-time students (12 for half-time students receiving a prorated award)
  • achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale

During your subsequent years as an APS recipient:

  • complete 24 semester credits or equivalent for full-time students (12 for half-time students receiving a prorated award)
  • achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale

As a graduate student:

  • achieve and maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale

You must also meet all requirements for satisfactory academic progress set by your institution, including requirements that may be higher.


I plan to take far more than the minimum credits required and graduate with a bachelor's degree in three years instead of the usual four. Can I get all four years' worth of awards in the three-year time period?

Yes. An APS recipient may request scholarship funds on an accelerated basis in which the standard four years/eight semesters of funding is compressed into a three years/six semester timeframe. An APS recipient electing to do so must meet accelerated credit completion requirements, including completion of 36 semester hours in the first year of enrollment and 45 semester hours in each of the next two years of enrollment. Contact ACPE at 1-800-441-2962 to learn more.


Alaska School Contact Lookup Tool

Select a school for the drop down menu below. Information for an Alaska Performance Scholarship contact person will display to the right.

Please report incorrect school contact information to Erin Thompson.



 

 

 

 

Information for School District Staff

Thank you for your work helping students prepare to be eligible for the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS).

Erin Thompson is the APS Program Coordinator for the Department of Education & Early Development (EED). She is responsible for helping school districts meet their obligations to: 1) determine students’ APS eligibility, 2) ensure this information becomes part of each student’s permanent school records, and, 3) ensure student eligibility status is transmitted to EED.

School districts will provide this information to EED through their Summer OASIS reporting. The due date for the Summer OASIS data collection is July 15. EED encourages school districts to submit their complete and accurate data in a timely fashion so that students will receive ample notice of their eligibility status.

Check back frequently for new information or subscribe to updates for important changes.

 

APS Program Participation For Educational Institutions

APS LogoAll schools or postsecondary training providers requesting to administer Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) funds must:

1. Have an established status with the Commission on Postsecondary Education.

2. Submit the Program Participation Agreement and all supporting documentation.

View a list of participating Alaska postsecondary institutions.

 

Important Information: The deadline for the application period for Alaska postsecondary institutions wishing to enroll students receiving APS funds is March 31 of the year prior to the academic year beginning July 1. For more information, please contact our office at ACPE@alaska.gov or 800.441.2962 (In Juneau, dial 907.465.2962).

 

 

Required Forms:

Application and Certification:  Required for all institutions requesting to administer APS funds.

Career and Technical Education CTE Certificate Program Information: Complete for each APS-eligible CTE certificate program. For purposes of scholarship determination, a CTE certificate program is a terminal non-degree program intended to lead directly to employment.

The following sample documents must be included for each CTE certificate program the institution intends to be APS-eligible:

  1. The credential awarded upon completion of the program (ex: blank diploma or certificate).

  2. The enrollment contract and/or admissions application provided to students.

  3. The institutional catalog, program brochure and/or other information provided to students containing program description and itemized student costs.

Required Forms:

Application and Certification: Required for all institutions requesting to administer APS funds.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Certificate Program Information: For the purposes of scholarship determination, a CTE certificate program is a terminal non-degree program intended to lead directly to employment.  Attach one CTE Certificate Program Information Form for each CTE certificate program.

The following sample documents must be included for each CTE certificate program the institution intends to be APS-eligible:

  1. The credential awarded upon completion of the program (ex: blank diploma or certificate).

  2. The enrollment contract and/or admissions application provided to students.

  3. The institutional catalog, program brochure and/or other information provided to students containing program description and itemized student costs.

Institutional financial information for the most recently completed fiscal year.

Consent for Release of Information to the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education. (Required for sole proprietorships and related non-corporate ownership structures.)

MEET APS RECIPIENTS – We are proud of all the dedicated students that have received the APS. Here are 3 student stories.
Andrew Lastimoso
-- APS Level 2, 2013
Money was tight when Andrew's parents were raised in the Philippines, so tight that as children they would study by candlelight because their families couldn't afford electricity. Both parents, knowing the value of an education, pursued and instilled that same value in Dimond HS graduate Andrew Lastimoso. Andrew now shares his journey for the Alaska Performance Scholarship with the rest of us.
Sheryce Marshall
-- APS Level 3, 2012
Life didn't always come easy for Thunder Mountain High School graduate Sheryce Marshall. But with a positive attitude, perseverance, and a little help from the Alaska Performance Scholarship Sheryce is living the dream she's envisioned for herself. This is Sheryce's story.
Ian Sanders
-- APS Level 1, 2011
Ian said his family could not afford to send him to college. Then he learned about the Alaska Performance Scholarship from his Bethel High School College & Career Guide. Loaded with this information and focused determination, Ian graduated with a 4.4 GPA! He is now attending UAA and ready to change the world! This is Ian's story.

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Alaska Student Aid Portal

 

Track your Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) and Alaska Education Grant (AEG).

  • Was my FAFSA received?
  • What APS level did my school report for me?
  • How much time do I have left to use my awards?
  • Why did I not get an award this year?  

APS Webinars

Students, parents, educators, and other interested parties are welcome to join us to learn more about the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS). Participants will learn about eligibility requirements, award levels, the application process, and using the award. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions.

 

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